By: ODETA KAVALIAUSKAS-JOHNSON / Correspondent      Photograph by: DEBBIE HERRERA / Photography Co-Editor

Dr. David Abeling-Judge enjoys teaching, but is passionate about human connection and making the world a better place

Abeling-Judge’s name says a lot about his personality.

“I was Abeling and he was Judge,” said Lauren Abeling-Judge, his wife.“I wanted to have the same surname as our child(ren). He was the one who suggested we hyphenate together.”

Abeling-Judge also makes it a point to introduce himself to students as A.J., an informality indicative of his teaching style.

Sophomore Doug Flora is a freshman redshirt on the Barton football team and has taken three of David’s classes.

“I make it a priority to speak up in class and feel comfortable doing so,” said Flora, “Friends don’t let friends stand awkwardly in front of a class waiting for feedback.”

Abeling-Judge originally taught at his alma mater Northeastern University. As a graduate student, he was expected to teach some courses in exchange for funding, but later realized that he loved it. The first course he taught was research methods.

“I wasn’t sure if I was really connecting with the students,” said Abeling-Judge. The second class he taught was an upper level course over the summer.

“Most of my students were those who had just taken research methods. It hit home that the students enjoyed studying with me,” said Abeling-Judge.

Students who have taken David’s classes know of his passion for data and cold, hard numbers. Lauren shares this passion, saying that data is the “nitty-gritty details that drives a field forward.” Others share a different perspective.

“[David] says it’s about the numbers, but I know in my heart that it’s deeper than that,” said Flora, “He has an untamed curiosity about people that has led him to an equal fascination with research and statistics.”

Abeling-Judge left his position at Emmanuel College teaching criminological theories for an opening at Barton in August of 2016.

“The program wanted someone to teach research methods and statistics…and I am the weird person who loves the research methods process,” said Abeling-Judge.

Lauren described how Abeling-Judge’s teaching style extends to his home life with a common phrase used with Abigail, their three-year-old daughter: “Don’t raise your voice, improve your argument.”

Abeling-Judge work as a developmental and life-course criminologist has also influenced his parenting.

“I believe that data is constantly running through his mind every time he plays with our daughter,” he said “It empirically demonstrates that the bond he is building will aid her in the future.”

According to his wife and students, one of Abeling-Judge’s best attributes is his deep sense of empathy.

“I don’t believe I am going to change the world,” he said, “but spending a career making the next generation of criminal justice leaders a little smarter and more insightful about the rising problems they will have to face is a worthwhile challenge. In teaching I hope to plant the seeds of change, even if they don’t grow in my lifetime.”

He enjoys watching The Great British Baking Show on his downtime, has an enduring love of history handed down from his father, and was, according to himself, a “theatre nerd” in high school.

Abeling-Judge and his wife met during a summer acting program in Chicago and have been together for 18 years. David has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Lawrence University, a Master of Science in Forensic Mental Health Science from King’s College London, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Criminology and Justice Policy from Northeastern University.

He has published several papers in journals such as the “Journal of Developmental and Life Course Criminology”, “Crime & Delinquency,” and “Deviant Behavior.”

 

Dr. David Abeling-Judge enjoys teaching, but is passionate about human connection and making the world a better place

Abeling-Judge’s name says a lot about his personality.

“I was Abeling and he was Judge,” said Lauren Abeling-Judge, his wife.“I wanted to have the same surname as our child(ren). He was the one who suggested we hyphenate together.”

Abeling-Judge also makes it a point to introduce himself to students as A.J., an informality indicative of his teaching style.

Sophomore Doug Flora is a freshman redshirt on the Barton football team and has taken three of David’s classes.

“I make it a priority to speak up in class and feel comfortable doing so,” said Flora, “Friends don’t let friends stand awkwardly in front of a class waiting for feedback.”

Abeling-Judge originally taught at his alma mater Northeastern University. As a graduate student, he was expected to teach some courses in exchange for funding, but later realized that he loved it. The first course he taught was research methods.

“I wasn’t sure if I was really connecting with the students,” said Abeling-Judge. The second class he taught was an upper level course over the summer.

“Most of my students were those who had just taken research methods. It hit home that the students enjoyed studying with me,” said Abeling-Judge.

Students who have taken David’s classes know of his passion for data and cold, hard numbers. Lauren shares this passion, saying that data is the “nitty-gritty details that drives a field forward.” Others share a different perspective.

“[David] says it’s about the numbers, but I know in my heart that it’s deeper than that,” said Flora, “He has an untamed curiosity about people that has led him to an equal fascination with research and statistics.”

Abeling-Judge left his position at Emmanuel College teaching criminological theories for an opening at Barton in August of 2016.

“The program wanted someone to teach research methods and statistics…and I am the weird person who loves the research methods process,” said Abeling-Judge.

Lauren described how Abeling-Judge’s teaching style extends to his home life with a common phrase used with Abigail, their three-year-old daughter: “Don’t raise your voice, improve your argument.”

Abeling-Judge work as a developmental and life-course criminologist has also influenced his parenting.

“I believe that data is constantly running through his mind every time he plays with our daughter,” he said “It empirically demonstrates that the bond he is building will aid her in the future.”

According to his wife and students, one of Abeling-Judge’s best attributes is his deep sense of empathy.

“I don’t believe I am going to change the world,” he said, “but spending a career making the next generation of criminal justice leaders a little smarter and more insightful about the rising problems they will have to face is a worthwhile challenge. In teaching I hope to plant the seeds of change, even if they don’t grow in my lifetime.”

He enjoys watching The Great British Baking Show on his downtime, has an enduring love of history handed down from his father, and was, according to himself, a “theatre nerd” in high school.

Abeling-Judge and his wife met during a summer acting program in Chicago and have been together for 18 years. David has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Lawrence University, a Master of Science in Forensic Mental Health Science from King’s College London, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Criminology and Justice Policy from Northeastern University.

He has published several papers in journals such as the “Journal of Developmental and Life Course Criminology”, “Crime & Delinquency,” and “Deviant Behavior.”